Organize and store your jewelry.

Now that you have sorted through your jewelry, you should figure out a way to store it.  I bought a jewelry storage center at Marshalls about five ago for around $35, more than what I wanted to spend (secret:  I’m cheap), but well worth it.  The one I have holds bracelets, necklaces, rings, earrings, and watches, so it’s multi-functional.  If you are in the market to purchase a jewelry organizer, I would suggest looking at Marshalls, TJ Maxx, Ross, and Bealls for decently priced organizers, but you might also see if your local craft boutique carries refinished vintage jewelry boxes.

If you’re looking for a less expensive or a do-it-yourself option, check out my new Pinterest board about how to organize your jewelry!  (Again, this board is on my new Simplify. Declutter. Organize Pinterest profile for my new blog.)

If you have mostly rings, you could try a ring display case.  Rings can also go in a ring dish, which can be something as simple as a $1.99 dipping bowl from Target or Pier 1.  If you have a lot of necklaces and bracelets, you will need something different, obviously, something that will not allow these to become tangled.  You can also combine these ideas and use, for example, the mug holder to hold bracelets and necklaces and dishes to hold your rings.

Time required:  I organized my jewelry into my organizer five years ago.  I spent about an hour on this task, and thanks to how complete my own organizer is, it has stayed organized!  Your mileage will vary.  Obviously, if you decide to build your own jewelry organizer–especially one of those beautiful wooden ones!–you will spend a great deal more time on this task.

 

 

Sort through your jewelry.

By now, you should be finished or nearly finished sorting through your clothing.  The task for the next few days is to sort through your jewelry.

If you have sentimental jewelry that you have no intention of wearing, I would recommend putting it in a safe or safe deposit box along with a note of the jewelry’s significance.  Otherwise, if you have jewelry you haven’t worn in ages, consider donating it to the local thrift store.  If you have damaged jewelry (I have a pearl necklace with a broken clasp, for example), get it repaired.

One note:  I’ve simplified my worries in the last couple of years by focusing on wearing jewelry that doesn’t feel irreplaceable.  For example, the “diamond” earrings and pendant I wear on a daily basis don’t contain real diamonds.  I’m content now with lab-created sapphires and emeralds because I don’t worry about losing them in public.  I still wear my diamond engagement ring, but other than that, most of my “public” jewelry was $50 or less.

Time required:  An hour or so for me, mainly because I have a hard time parting with items with a sentimental attachment, such as the myriad pieces of jewelry I received over the years for participating in various weddings.